Monday, 6 December 2010

What words say does not last. The words last because words are always the same, and what they say is never the same.

(Antonio Porchia, Voces, 1943, translated from Spanish by W.S. Merwin) 

These columns are compulsory reading. They will really make you think, especially the one entitled the beauty and utility of language are connected.

10 comments:

Jacinto said...

Dear Nina, I am impressed with your overwhelming new blog (a kind of Nina's Cabagges 2.0). Still pretending you're very busy with your duties and has no free time? Let me be a bit skeptical.
Congratulations, it's a fabulous job, and I'll enjoy it quite often.
Kisses.

nina said...

I'm glad you like it, Jacinto. I'm seriously considering renaming it. Nina's Cabbages 2.0 - it has a definite futuristic ring to it. I love it!

anazambranolociga said...

After reading this, I only can say that the point is to be consistent and I promise to make an effort in my following writings, using parallel structure.

crcobano said...

I really liked the post, the explanations are equally clear and comprehensive, congratulations!
Nevertheless, I must add this is one of those things that make us Spaniards think: "that must be English, 'cause I don't get it". I mean, we don't care that much about parallel structures, or if we do, I didn't notice at all! Am I wrong or does anyone agree with me? In that case, maybe should I intone the "mea culpa"...
Anyway, that's not the point. What I want to state is that I don't understand how the exercises work, really. Why is there a link for answering, if we can't answer at all? Is it designed for printing, perhaps, or is there any trick I missed? It would have been so nice to have an instant feedback to know whether our answers were correct or not-
Well, no more complaints and shoulders to the wheel! :)
Have a nice weekend all of you, Nina and bloggers!

crcobano said...

After reading the post on inversion, I know now I should have written "maybe I should intone the mea culpa"... And really do it as a punishment! ;)

nina said...

Hi crcobano! Thank you for your comments, and very well expressed I might add. I'm not sure I understand the problem with the answers, though. I take your point about where to answer (in your head, on a sheet of paper, back of your hand, etc.) but you do get instant feedback if you click on "answer"; or are we talking at cross purposes here? Generally speaking these exercises are designed to make one think about the parts before getting back to the whole. As Nathaniel Hawthorne once wrote "Easy reading is damn hard writing". In any case, a good bit of self-correction there.
You too have a good weekend!

María said...

Parallel construction is an step ahead to improve our communication skill. However,I reckon is a difficult challenge for us, as we must pay attention to many other thing_vocabulary,tenses and so on.
Maybe we use too many unnecessary phrases which break the main idea of what we want to express.
After finding out what State Fair meant to the EE.UU, I agree with Stephen Wilbers about how nice the story of Minnesota State Fair is.
As Wilbers believes,the text is a blend of clarity,style,personality, elegance and grace.
As it happens I just heard Vargas Llosas' speech, as Literature prize-winner, and I realize it's full of parallel structures, making it so brilliant.

nina said...

In the words of Roger McDonald, "Your progress depends upon your degree of sustained intensity in a given direction." Clearly, Maria, you are reaching for the stars. Well done and keep it up!

gracia said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
gracia said...

After reading these texts I have realized that parallel structure gives the reading flexibility, efficiency and rythm.From now to know I will use it in my writings and I hope that in future I will write with subtlety and clarity